Proposed designation of spectrum for spectrum licensing | ACMA

Proposed designation of spectrum for spectrum licensing

Issue for comment 7/2013

Consultation on the proposed designation of spectrum for spectrum licensing 800 MHz, 1800 MHz and 2 GHz is now complete

The ACMA has finalised consultation on its proposal to designate spectrum licences that are not re-issued in the 800 MHz, 1800 MHz, 2 GHz, 3.4 GHz and 31 GHz bands designates well as the residual spectrum in the 2 GHz band.

Submissions received

The ACMA received submissions from Telstra Corporation Limited, SingTel Optus Pty Limited and the Australian Mobile Telecommunications Association in response to the consultation paper Proposed designation of spectrum for spectrum licensing – 800 MHz, 1800 MHz and 2 GHz. The submissions are available below:

Submissions indicated that stakeholders were supportive of the ACMA’s proposals. Stakeholders were of the view that the ACMA should make a recommendation to the Minister that he designate for allocation by spectrum licensing any frequency ranges in the 800 MHz and 1800 MHz that are not re-issued prior to expiry; and the residual spectrum in the 2 GHz band.

The way forward

2 GHz residual spectrum

The ACMA recommended to the Minister for Broadband, Communications and the Digital Economy that he designate the following spectrum for allocation by issuing spectrum licences:

  • 1915–1920 MHz in Canberra, Darwin and Hobart
  • 1930–1935 MHz and 2120–2125 MHz in Adelaide, Perth, Brisbane, Darwin and Hobart
  • 1920–1930 MHz and 2110–2120 MHz in Darwin and Hobart
Expiring spectrum licences that are not re-issued

The 800 MHz and Tranche 1 of the 1800 MHz bands will be the first of the spectrum licensed bands to expire on 17 June 2013. The outcome of those re-issue processes is unlikely to be known prior to that date. A decision on whether to recommend that any spectrum that is not re-issued be designated by the Minister for spectrum licensing will be made by the ACMA after that date.

The ACMA is seeking the views of interested stakeholders on its broad policy approach to spectrum licences that are not re-issued in the 800 MHz, 1800 MHz, 2 GHz, 3.4 GHz and 31 GHz bands, specifically the approach to future arrangements in the 800 MHz and 1800 MHz bands. The ACMA also seeks views on designating and the residual spectrum in the 2 GHz band.

Background

Spectrum licences in these bands were first issued in the late 1990s and early 2000s and are now approaching expiry. While some of these licences may be re-issued to the same licensees, the ACMA must also consider its approach to the allocation of any non-reissued spectrum in those bands.

Spectrum licences in the 2 GHz band were originally allocated in March 2001. At the time, a number of lots in Adelaide, Perth, Brisbane, Darwin and Hobart were passed in at auction and no spectrum licences were issued for them. As the ACMA considers that there may be increasing demand for access to spectrum in the 2 GHz band from telecommunications providers, it is taking the opportunity to address this issue as well.

The ACMA consultation paper Proposed designation of spectrum for spectrum licensing—800 MHz, 1800 MHz and 2 GHz bands is available in Word (.docx 579 kb) or PDF (449 kb).

Submissions can be made:

By email: spectrum.outlook@acma.gov.au

By mail:
Manager
Spectrum Outlook and Review Section
Australian Communications and Media Authority
PO Box 78
Belconnen ACT 2616

The closing date for submissions was 15 March 2013.

Media enquiries should be directed to Emma Rossi on (02) 9334 7980 or by email to media@acma.gov.au.


Publication of submissions

In general, the ACMA publishes all submissions it receives.

The ACMA prefers to receive submissions that are not claimed to be confidential. However, the ACMA accepts that a submitter may sometimes wish to provide information in confidence. In these circumstances, submitters are asked to identify the material over which confidentiality is claimed and provide a written explanation for the claim.

The ACMA will consider each confidentiality claim on a case-by-case basis. If the ACMA accepts a claim, it will not publish the confidential information unless authorised or required by law to do so.

Release of submissions where authorised or required by law

Any submissions provided to the ACMA may be released under the Freedom of Information Act 1982 (unless an exemption applies) or shared with other Commonwealth Government agencies under Part 7A of the Australian Communications and Media Authority Act 2005. The ACMA may also be required to release submissions for other reasons including for the purpose of parliamentary processes or where otherwise required by law (for example, under a court subpoena). While the ACMA seeks to consult submitters of confidential information before that information is provided to another party, the ACMA cannot guarantee that confidential information will not be released through these or other legal means.

Effective consultation

The ACMA is working to enhance the effectiveness of its stakeholder consultation processes, which are an important source of evidence for its regulatory development activities. To assist stakeholders in formulating submissions to its formal, written consultation processes, it has developed a guide called Effective consultation: A guide to making a submission. This guide provides information about the ACMA's formal, written, public consultation processes and practical guidance on how to make a submission.

Last updated: 05 December 2017