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Regulating

How to make a report or complaint

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Make your complaint heard, by directing it to the right place.

Television complaints

If you see something on TV that you think breaches a code:

  1. Complain directly to the station

  2. If you don’t get a response within 60 days, or aren't satisfied with the response, you can complain to the Australian Communications and Media Authority (ACMA).

The ACMA cannot accept complaints about the quality or scheduling of programs, the content of advertisements, or advertising on the ABC.

If you see something that you think breaches a licence condition or a standard, you can make a complaint directly to the ACMA. Standards applicable to television include:

  1. Children’s television standards

  2. Australian content standards

  3. Anti-siphoning rules

  4. Anti-terrorism standards

Not sure where to address your complaint? Find out more .

You can access the broadcasting complaints form via the ACMA website.

Radio complaints

If you hear something on the radio you think breaches a code:

  1. Complain directly to the station

  2. If you don’t get a response within 60 days, or aren't satisfied with the response, you can complain to the ACMA.

The ACMA cannot accept complaints about the quality of programs or the accuracy of advertisements.

If you hear something on radio you think breaches a licence condition or standard you can make a complaint to the ACMA.

You can access the broadcasting complaints form via the ACMA website.

Email spam complaints

If you’ve received emails from an Australian business you consider to be unsolicited, or if your request to unsubscribe from an email list wasn’t actioned:

Make a spam complaint

Internet complaints

If you see something on the internet you think may be prohibited under the Broadcasting Services Act 1992, you can make a complaint to the ACMA.

 

  1. internet content complaints

  2. internet gambling

Mobile content complaints

If you receive SMS or MMS you consider to be unsolicited, or if your request to unsubscribe from an SMS or MMS list wasn’t actioned:

  1. make a spam complaint

  2. make an mobile content complaint

Telephone carrier or internet service provider complaints

If you are unsatisfied with how your provider deals with your complaint, contact the:

Telecommunications Industry Ombudsman

Interference to Television or radio reception

The ACMA can provide a diagnostic and advisory service in relation to television and radio reception:

Reception and interference

Access to digital television via satellite

Viewers experiencing difficulties gaining access to digital television broadcasting services via satellite can:

Make a satellite television access complaint

Interference to radiocommunications operated under an apparatus licence

Apparatus licence holders experiencing radiocommunications interference to licensed receivers should complete and submit form R066.

Interference to radiocommunications operated under a spectrum licence

Spectrum licence holders experiencing radiocommunications interference to registered receivers should complete and submit:

ACMA form R111

Unlabelled or non-compliant equipment

If you find electronic, electrical, radiocommunications or telecommunications products being supplied to the Australian market that don’t comply with the relevant standards:

You can make a complaint to ACMA

Cabling complaints

To complain about an unregistered cabler performing cabling work, or cabling work that is not compliant with the Australian standard:

Make a cabling complaint

A telemarketing call or marketing fax

If you receive a telemarketing call or marketing fax after registering your number on the Do Not Call Register:

Make a complaint to the ACMA

Complaints or feedback about the ACMA's service

The ACMA welcomes comment and feedback on the quality of its services:

ACMA complaints/feedback


 

Last updated: 24 August 2016

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