The ACMA

Internet content

Internet gambling complaints

Internet gambling

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What is prohibited internet gambling content?

The Interactive Gambling Act 2001 (the IGA) makes it an offence to provide or advertise interactive gambling to Australians. This includes casino-style games and live sports wagering (also known as 'in-play' wagering) made available over the internet. A copy of the IGA can be found on the ComLaw website.

I want to make an enquiry about internet gambling

The ACMA is responsible for investigating formal complaints made under the IGA about the provision of prohibited internet gambling content.

To find out more about the ACMA's role under the IGA, please email us at info@acma.gov.au or contact us at the address below:

Manager, Community Broadcasting and Safeguards Section
Australian Communications and Media Authority
PO Box Q500 Queen Victoria Building NSW 1230
TEL: 1300 850 115
FAX: (02) 9334 7799

General information about the IGA, as well as information about the Commonwealth Government's interactive gambling policy, is available from the Department of Communications.

I want to make an enquiry about the advertising of interactive gambling

The ACMA may also investigate complaints, under the IGA, about advertisements for interactive gambling services that are broadcast on TV or radio.

Enquiries about other forms of advertising for interactive gambling, including online or print advertising, should be directed to the Department of Communications.

I want to make an enquiry about the legality of a gambling service I am proposing

Advice in relation to whether a proposed service, or advertisement, may be prohibited under the IGA should be sought from an independent legal adviser.

I want to make an enquiry about recovering money from a gambling service

The ACMA’s jurisdiction and role under the IGA does not include taking action on behalf of Australian users who have deposited money with a gambling site. This means the ACMA is not able to assist you with recouping money from online gambling services. If you have experienced an issue recovering money from an online gambling service you may wish to seek independent legal advice. You may also consider making a complaint to the Australian Competition & Consumer Commission.

I want to make a complaint

You may complain to the ACMA about prohibited internet gambling content.

To make a complaint about internet content, you must be one of the following:

  • a person who resides in Australia; or
  • a body corporate that carries on activities in Australia; or
  • the Commonwealth, a State or a Territory.

How do I make a complaint?

You may email your complaint to info@acma.gov.au or post/fax your complaint to:

Manager, Community Broadcasting and Safeguards Section
Australian Communications and Media Authority
PO Box Q500 Queen Victoria Building NSW 1230
Tel: 1300 850115
Fax: (02) 9334 7799

Please note that complaints to the ACMA about prohibited internet gambling content to the ACMA must be made in writing.

In making a complaint to the ACMA, please provide the following information:

  • the internet address of the internet gambling content and any other details required to access it; and
  • a description of the internet gambling service.

You are able to remain anonymous when you complain to the ACMA if you wish.

What will the ACMA do?

The action taken by the ACMA in relation to prohibited internet gambling content depends on whether the content is hosted in Australia or overseas.

If the complaint is about internet gambling content that is hosted in Australia, the ACMA must not investigate the complaint. Where the ACMA believes that such a complaint should be referred to an Australian police force, the ACMA will refer the matter to the Australian Federal Police (AFP).

If the complaint is about internet gambling content hosted outside Australia, the ACMA may investigate and if the content is found to be prohibited under the IGA, will notify the content to makers of the approved Family Friendly Filters listed in Schedule 1 to the Interactive Gambling Act industry code.

The ACMA may also refer a complaint about prohibited internet gambling content to the AFP where the ACMA believes that such a referral is appropriate (eg. the material is hosted in a country of interest to the AFP).

Regardless of the outcome, the ACMA will advise all people who lodge a complaint about the ACMA's handling of the complaint.

Last updated: 09 October 2015

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