Metropolitan commercial television licensees exceed Australian content quotas in 2010 | ACMA

Metropolitan commercial television licensees exceed Australian content quotas in 2010

ACMA media release 73/2011 – 2 August

All metropolitan commercial television licensees exceeded the requirements of the Australian Content Standard and Children's Television Standards in 2010, according to figures released today by the Australian Communications and Media Authority.

ACMA Chairman Chris Chapman said that the commercial networks all exceeded the required 55 per cent Australian content level.

'It is again heartening to see so much Australian content on our local television screens during 2010,' said Mr Chapman.

  • Seven Network's licensees (in the five mainland state capital cities) averaged around 69 per cent Australian content
  • Network Ten licensees averaged 61 per cent
  • Nine Network licensees (in the three metropolitan markets of Sydney, Melbourne and Brisbane) averaged more than 64 per cent

'Local documentaries were also strong, with the metropolitan networks exceeding the annual quota of 20 hours for first release Australian documentaries,' Mr Chapman said.

  • Seven Network broadcast more than 107 hours
  • Nine Network 45 hours
  • Network Ten 36 hours

The networks also exceeded the triennial requirement of 860 points for airing first release Australian drama programs over the 2008 - 2010 period. Seven Network licensees achieved 918 points, Nine Network licensees achieved 876 points while Network Ten licensees achieved 878 points.

The metropolitan networks also met the quota requirements for adult drama and children's programs in 2010.

Mr Chapman said that the 2010 ratings highlighted that local programs were the most popular amongst Australians.

'All of the top 40 rating programs were Australian,' said Mr Chapman. 'As well, all the 20 top spots in the light entertainment and reality genre were Australian produced, and, in drama, the top four programs were home-grown, with seven programs finding a place in the top 20. Major Australian sports fixtures accounted for the top 20 sports programs.'

The compliance results for 2010 are available on ACMA's website.

For more information or to arrange an interview please contact: Emma Rossi Media Manager, on (02) 9334 7719, 0434 652 063 or media@acma.gov.au.

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The ACMA is Australia's regulator for broadcasting, the internet, radiocommunications and telecommunications. The ACMA's strategic intent is to make communications and media work in Australia's public interest. For more information: www.acma.gov.au.

 

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Background

The ACMA monitors commercial television broadcasting licensees' compliance with the Australian Content Standard using its Australian content database. This contains information provided by the commercial television networks under a self-reporting system about the programs broadcast by their metropolitan services. The ACMA also collects compliance information from regional commercial television licensees, including network affiliates and independent broadcasters.

Australian and children's programming requirements

The Australian Content Standard and Children's Television Standards for commercial television require that Australian programs must make up at least 55 per cent of all programming broadcast by a licensee between 6 am and midnight each year, and that:

  • a licensee must broadcast at least 20 hours of first release Australian documentary programs each year
  • a licensee must broadcast at least 260 hours of children's (C) programs each year
  • a licensee must broadcast at least 130 hours of first release Australian (C) programs (50 per cent of total C requirement) each year
  • a licensee must broadcast in the C band at least 8 hours of repeat Australian C drama programs each year
  • a licensee must broadcast at least 130 hours of Australian preschool (P) programs each year
  • annual drama requirement - the drama scores for all first release Australian drama programs broadcast by a licensee in prime time in any year - must total at least 250
  • the three year drama requirement, which scores for all first release Australian drama programs broadcast by a licensee in prime time, must be at least 860 over three years
  • a licensee must broadcast the C drama's annual requirement - at least 25 hours of first release Australian children's drama programs - each year
  • that for the three year requirement for C drama, licensee must broadcast in each three-year period at least 96 hours of first release Australian children's drama.

Table 1: Australian Content Standard and Children's Television Standards compliance - January 2010 to December 2010

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Last updated: 24 May 2016